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people, including ethnic and religious minority, whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> but even as the president called for access to information, china was tightly controllg it. the meeting with a carefully screened group of students who were coached beforehand was not broadcast live across the country, and while it was available on two big national internet sites, it was hard to hear. and one big website, the xinhua news agency told people that the obamauñ÷ live, but then on the screen apparently fails to deliver on that promise. in tonight's "lead focus," we take an in depth look at the obama visit and its significance, beginning with the presidents day from melissa chan of al jazeera english. >> reporter: the president is now in beijing, but earlier in the day, he was in shanghai for his town hall meeting. it's the favorite format for the american president, a conversation with the people, talking about u.s./china relations. >> our world is now fundamentally interconnected. the jobs we do, the prosperity we build, the environment we protect, the securit
think the with the can make? >> i think the intent is first to show the united states is very serious about the energy and climate issue, number one. number two, copenhagen, as president rasmussen has said, since congress won't be able to address the energy and climate bill until after copenhagen that it's a framework for all countries -- let me say that he proposed you expect going in, a framework that will say this is our goal, this is going to be towards a lelie binding treaty. we're not going to get there in copenhagen but this is the step we need to take in order to get there. the good news is there's a lot of motion going on and i am encouraged that a lot of countries are beginning to say, considering where we were five years ago and beyond, things are looking very positive. >> mr. secretary, the white house on wednesday also announced that it would offer a 20/20 emissions cut proposal 17% below 2005 levels. and described this proposal as a provisional proposal, earlyly contingent on congress enacting this legislation. what happens if the congress doesn't enact legislation? >> w
is to understand the circumstances that are going on right now in terms of the compromise of the united states sovereignty by what's happening to the dollar with deficits budget to be positive so the last third of this book is solutions. what we can do as a subtitle says fighting new world order, surviving the global depression and preserving u.s. sovereignty. so the themes of this book at the last third or to give solutions and call to action for how we can organize our lives, how we can organize politically in order to fight back to say no to a global new deal. now, to get everyone's mind of around the idea of america for sale, i like to start at this way. we currently have page 24 of the book and document we have got about a 65.5 trillion what the t negative net worth. now what that means, that is according to the department treasury's own statistics. once a year the deeper and the treasury does a gap accounting and david walker, who was the head of the government accountability office actually resigned in 2008 it went on the week up to our alarming people, telling people essentially that i
. one country's success need not co at the expense of another. that is why the united states insists we do not seek to contn china's rise. on the contrary, we welcome ina as a stron and prosperous and sucssful member o the community of nations. >> reporter: answering a qution on internet access ina -- >> unrestcted internet access a source ofrength, and i thinshould be encouraged. i think that the morereely formation flows, the stronger the society beces because tn citizens of countries around the world can hold their own governmes accountable. ey can begin tohink for themselves that generates new ideas. >> reporter: and disssing cooperation on climate change -- >> the united stat and china are th world's two larst emitters of greenhous ges, of carbon that is causing the planet to warm. so unls both of ou countries are willg to take critical steps in dealing with this issue, we wil not be able to resolve it. >> reporter: there's no down china d the u.s. wil be v to workogether on a variety of world problems, but don't expect any major announcements fro this visit. after shangi, the pres
, john, because i don't think it will get through the united states senate. there's a reason for that, john. al gore's moment has come and gone. the truth is, they are changing the nile to climate change rather than global warming for a reason. for ten years, the earth has been cooling. 1998 or so was the hottest year. the polar bear population is doing fine. antarctica is growing, the ice cap is growing. the arctic ice cap has stopped shrinking. you look around the united states, you are having record cold trends. you have this tremendous real problem in the american economy as opposed toed mythical problem of global warming. for these reasons, john, i think it's not going to get through the senate. i think, as i say, al gore's moment has passed. this whole thing was a bit of a hoax designed to transfer power from individuals and wealth to governments and from governments to transnational, international corporations, global institutions. that time has come, and it has gone. >> eleanor? >> that was both a minority view and paranormic view that it's all a conspiracy to transfer power.
with the united states both economic and security. the obama administration really doesn't want to revisit all of that, but president obama said on the record he understand that a new party coming to power will want to take a look at all the underlying agreements negotiated with the united states by the liberal democratic party. the big issues that will be on the table between these two leaders -- climate change, north korea, and trade. one other issue, of course, is afghanistan with the democratic party of japan came in, the prime minister decided to end a long-standing refueling operation the japanese were conducting with vessels in the indian ocean. but in exchange, the japanese government has put up funds in reconstruction aid. botin the main, this summit, the second time the two leaders have met is not going to produce any new u.s.-japanese announcement on any of the issues i discussed but it will be an opportunity for the two to discuss trade, north korea and climate change. steve: major, just a moment ago the white house office of the press secretary released something. apparently the u
. . every industrialized country has that system except the united states. we are going to change that. national polls show that the majority of doctors and the majority of americans favor a single payer system. that is why six months ago, we went to capitol hill. when senator baucus opened that first day of hearing in may, i stood up and said, excuse me, sir, why have you taken single payer off the table? why have you not allowed one doctor testify for single payer? baucus ordered us arrested. one by one, margaret, kevin, carol, and four others stood up and confronted baucus. and one by one we were all arrested and charged with disruption of congress. in a plea deal earlier this year, we agreed not to disrupt congress throughout the end of this year. since that day in may, baucus and harry reid in the senate, and nancy pelosi and steny hoyer in the house have cobbled together incomprehensible legislation. it is convoluted and confusing. but one thing is clear -- president obama and the democrats have cut a dirty deal with the health insurance and pharmaceutical industries. obama took
effect. a recent study by our national academy of sciences found that here in the united states burning fossil fuels leads to almost 120 billion dollars in health costs a year. most of those costs are premature deaths, and we know that the cost in human lives can be even higher in countries we merging economies that have fewer resources to improve air quality. for all of these reasons, president obama and i understand that we cannot wait any longer to act. president obama has made it clear that he's committed to passing comprehensive energy and climate legislation that will create millions of new jobs and secure clean energy sources that are made in america and work for america. but in the meantime, we're looking for ways that we can start reducing this threat right now. last friday i saw some of you at a white house stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to invest
service is enshrined in the constitution of the united states. we have a law that says the postal service should produce universal service. we have to maintain a basic service. host: joseph, independent caller. caller: one of the previous callers mentioned at the topic -- the vending machines. i look forward to going to the post office now with dread. one local post office has a giant hole in the wall covered with plywood where the vending machines used to be. when i asked one of the minister why they were gone. she said it was cost control. there's no way it can be more efficient to have all those people waiting in line. it makes no sense to me. there's something seriously wrong with the reasoning behind this kind of decision. i have seen it across the board. they're using space in the post offices for selling packages that have teddy bears and balloons on them. they should be sticking to basics, common-sense service. if i can avoid going to the post office, i will do it. they might as well -- it is just a nightmare. it is a baffling ordeal. guest: i am sorry to your use say that. you ar
to assume and they don't like having all the pressure brought on by the united states to ratchet up the level of chinese obligation. >> rose: also this evening, french chef eric ripert of the famous new york restaurant la bernadine. >> so when i came to new york, we're talking about 20 years ago. i came with a very french way of seeing food with a very strong mediterranean influence and then i discovered japanese cuisine. i discovered chinese cuisine, i went to brooklyn and visit the stores where they have all the spices. i traveled throughout the u.s. and interact with many other chefs from other cultures. i discovered south america. i went to japan. and all of that is ultimately digested and comes back in the kind of... i call that smart fusion. >> rose: a look at china and the united states in the after math of the presidential visit and food through the skills of eric ripert next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: this evening we continue our coverage of president obama's visit to china. earlier today he
in this new media. when somebody stands up in the congress of the united states during the state of the union and said, " ." >> nobody in the caucus supported what he did -- "you lie." >> nobody in the caucus supported what he did. the civility is not news. we try not to bash the media, hillary. we had an earlier conversation that talk about immigration reform where a truly bipartisan group of senators get together and all slated then, not quite, but there were in large number of democratic and republican senators working on it. that was in 2007. john mccain was simultaneously running for president. he and senator kennedy were the two leaders, the co-authors of the bill. you never saw them together in public however. kennedy said to mccain, look, we cannot show up in tv cameras together or you will lose new hampshire. it is how the press promotes incivility. >> the sense of being in the political minority, the only way you get hurt is to be no easier and more obnoxious. clearly, democrats, we did that -- we talked a lot about this during george bush's presidency. now republicans are doing a t
the united states and india have not always been one. during the cold war, many saw india as unfriendly, which it might have been. during -- at the end of the cold war, there were opportunities to securitized. in the past several years, there has been a lifting of sanctions culminating in the historic civil nuclear accord. now, there@@@@@@h@ @ @ @ @ @ @ r strategic partnership. there is a need for wide ranging consultation to in grain habits of consultation -- to ingrain minister for being here. i want to welcome his entire delegation, including his most able ambassador and want to thank the gentleman standing here, lee hamilton, who is president and director of the woodrow wilson international center. i could not be more pleased to introduce the prime minister. lee hamilton resented the ninth district in the u.s. house of representatives and he is a model of what a legislator of to be. -- ought to be. congressman hamilton? [applause] >> good evening to you all and thank you for coming. i told the prime minister a moment ago that he was appearing before an extraordinary washington audie
-- and i would say enthusiastic role by the united states of america, these negotiations will not yield the kind of the kind of results that we are looking for. true, we would have hoped that the united states of america would have been more ambitious than what it has indicated. >> reporter: india is also one of the world's largest producers of greenhouse gas emissions, but is a relative newcomer to an industrialized economy. saran says the country has concerns that a climate agreement could stifle economic development. >> for us, climate change is not just a separate issue, it is intermixed with our developmental, you know, issues itself. so how we balance, you know, the problem of climate change with the other stresses and strains that the country is going through as this process of social and economic transformation, we would hope that there is some understanding of that challenge that we face. >> reporter: meantime, a series of studies released today in the british medical journal "the lancet" could give another boost to advocates of addressing climate change. the studies found that
but there is no question that commercial property in the united states is in bad shape it is going down. and there is a lot of genuine worries about that. dubai as a symbol might focus more attention next week but i think dubai is postly about emerging markets. our home problems are very much about the united states and they are very big and they are much bigger, actually, than the problems in dubai. >> warner: so the u.s. problems you think are a lot bigger. >> the total losses from the crisis so far worldwide which mostly concentrate on the united states $1.7 trillion. we're talking about credit losses in dubai of perhaps $20 billion. so that an order of magnitude, two orders of magnitude smaller in dubai than what we have seen in the united states. the additional problems in the united states are another 100, 200, 300 billion but they are coming on top of all these existing problems. they are coming into a banking system that is weak already in the united states. >> warner: so briefly do we have reason to be nervous by what happened today in dubai. >> yes, it should make us nervous. came at an ago waurd
my a role is to said how can the department of energy help the united states become economically competitive in this future clean energy economy and also, if we can get pardon ships with china and india that would be mutually beneficial to both of us, we have to get moving. it is just like the cafe center. that is getting moving. >> what number target from china would impress you? >> a number that would impress me, i would get to look at the details, but if i took their already stated it intensity and goals and where they want to be in terms of renewable energy, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, those things, anybody who wraps those things up and says we will be at least there, here is where we are going to be. but those are aggressive goals. that be quite a commitment. >> the administration is concerned not to repeat what they called the mistake of kyoto. our commitments to reduce emissions among developed countries. united states never ratified that, and the bush administration basically walked away from it. can you give some assurance that whatever commitment or promise or gold the
of denmark, the president of the united states, and some discussions with the chinese president, we have the capacity to lead an agreement at copenhagen. one which deals with the corps policy challenges for the future. namely, what temperature increase are we prepared to sustain in the future? what targets do we need from the major developed economies around the world? what commitment to action do we needrom the major emerging economies like china and india? how do we found this agreement? what kind of climate change process to put in place? if we can land and an outcome of those areas, we will have made a large step forward. and then translating that into legalese will take longer. >> talking about a long by the agreement is not possible? >> will we are talking about is what i would describe as an operational framework agreement. what president obama said the other day, one which would take immediate effect. there's a separation between what is said in a policy agreement, and the difficulty and complexity of translating that into a 4000 page binding legal document. you cannot get to the
together this time with the united states and with binding obligations in some form on china and other large emerging economies and it's significant because the scientific community globally has ratcheted up their sense of alarm and you are general they we really don't have too many years to begin are reducing the global warming pollution that is driving the earth's ecological system toward catastrophe. >> rose: stay with that. they say ten years. the window they say is ten years essentially? >> yeah, and they said that three years ago. >> rose: and cat trophy means what? >> there's certain elements in the earth's ecological system that could be pushed beyond a kind of tipping point the phrase is controversial. but if the greenland ice pack, for example, was induced to melt so rapidly that it could not be stopped that would lead to catastrophic sea level rise, similarly in west antarctica. either would produce a six to seven meter increase. the size of the continental united states, it's been there for three million years, a key element in the earth's ability to cool itself, if it disa
is the optimal solution to provide necessary medical treatment to everyone and the united states in a way that controls health care costs. pnhp doesn't, however, take a position on how congress members should vote on the legislation that is currently proceeding for congress. we do provide information to members about whether the legislation is likely to be ctive, and how icompes to a national single payer health care system. we joined the many health care reform advocates across the nation who are disappointed by the health insurance reform legislation that is passing through congress. we, like you, are seriously concerned by the health care environment in the united states. we are saddened by the number of people, our patience, family and friends who are donner and because they cannot receive or for access to health care. we are saddened by the number of people facing bankruptcy or foreclosure of their homes and those who are suffering needlessly because they cannot afford or have access to medical treatment. the anticipated a health care debate this year that would focus on the trees st
the united states and india can strengthen the global economic recovery, promote trade that creates jobs for both our people and pursue growth that is balanced and sustained. as nuclear powers we can be full partners in preventing the spread of the world's most deadly weapons, securing loose nuclear materials from terrorists, and pursuing our shared vision of a world without nuclear weapons. >> india and america are separated by distance but bound together by the values of democracy, rule of law and respect for fundamental human freedoms. >> reporter: there's also some hard cash involved in this. american businesses are looking at india and seeing dollar signs because as you look at their infrastructure rebuilding, ports, airports, roads, etc., the chamber of commerce predicts they could over the next five years, u.s. companies could make $500 billion. this is also a good deal. >> what do both sides get out of this state visit? >> reporter: i think the united states gives india what it wants which is recognition that it is a very important country in the world right now, that in spite of
seized a tank of crude oil from saudi riot -- saudi arabia to the united states. the 28 person crew was off the coast of somalia at the time. we have told you about several hijackings before but this is the second time only that pirates have hijacked an oil tanker. it is not clear how much oil was on board the ship, but it could be worth millions and more importantly it could wreck environmental havoc if the pirates dump it. host: also today, -- bill: also today, we are waiting on news from the white house to help struggling homeowners. this is truly startling news. the government is set to use a shame game to step up pressure on mortgage companies because they are not doing enough to keep homeowners in their homes. the way that i understand it, the new program would be aimed at lenders? >> the banks are going to be publicly blamed. they have taken this bailout money but they are not bailing out homeowners. they are going to appoint officials to oversee the operations of these lenders on a day-to-day basis. plus they will demand a plan from the lenders to speed up help for homeowner
be a good idea to admit the deposed and ailing shah of iran, to the united states for medical treatment. well, two weeks later we found ourselves in the embassy behind a steel door on the second floor of the old chancellor ri, the dearly-beloved henderson high that some of you may remember. and on the other side banging on the, banging on the door were this group of unhappy, unhappy iranians. well, it befell to me to -- having made one of probably the worst decisions of my foreign service career -- to go out from that door, to go out from behind the door and attempt, and i use this word with some trepidation, to negotiate with this, with this crowd to see if there was something we could do. maybe we could get them out or at least delay them because what was very clear to us already was that there was, we were on our own. that if anything was going to be done, we had to do it. we had made calls to the iranian government at the time or at least what passed for the iranian government, something called the provisional government of iran. and it was very clear from that contact that there wa
for afghanistan. >> the united states cannot be engaged in an open-ended commitment. >> his attorney general prosecutes the plot's masterm d mastermind. >> in a courthouse just blocks away from where the twin towers once stood. >> this is a big step in the wrong direction. >>> topics this morning for our headliners. secretary of state hillary clinton and former new york mayor, rudy giuliani. hillary and rudy only on "this week." >>> then -- >> we don't have to continue to go down this controversy road. >> she's back. >>> george will, gwen ifill of pbs. david brooks of "the new york "mother jones." corn from >>> and as always, the sunday funnies. >> before john mccain chose her as his running mate, his campaign spent $50,000 on a background check. when he heard this, john mccain said we should have spent $75,000. >>> and we begin today with the secretary of state hillary clinton. thanks for spending time with us this morning. >> it's a pleasure to talk with you from singapore, george. >> wel and as you're in singapore, you and the president are facing really his toughest decision yet on afg
are destroying the economy of the united states. this election is going to be interesting to see just tell the public is feeling. host: which races are you watching? caller: it is a foregone conclusion that virginia and creigh deeds ran a terrible campaign. the new york 23rd is traditionally a republican district. it will almost certainly go republican. a democrat has not won since 1850. corzine is a wall streeter. host: you would not bit surprised if corzine loses? the president has been there five times to campaign for him? the >> people are concerned about the tax rates in new jersey. -- caller: people are concerned about the tax rates in new jersey. they're not happy with corzine's leadership. host: let's hear from a voter voting in today's new york city mayor's race. who are you going to vote for? caller: thompson. chost: why is that? caller: mayor bloomberg is for the rich. when i went downtown, all the buildings were nothing but luxury buildings. people are getting a rent increase every single year. in one of his commercials, he said that crime is down in new york city. he did not m
of israelis and palestinians to live in peace and security. it is also in the interest of the united states. it is urgently needed. the president knows that achieving this goal will be difficult, but he also has said that he will not weaver and his persistent pursuit of comprehensive peace in the middle east. for that reason, he has dedicated himself and his administration to the resumption of israeli-palestinian negotiations and to the creation of an atmosphere that maximizes the prospects for success. to be clear, the steps we have suggested to all parties -- israel, the palestinians, and the arab states -- to improve the atmosphere for negotiations are not ends to themselves, and they certainly are not preconditions to negotiations. but they can make a valuable contribution toward achieving our goal of successful negotiations that result in a two-state solution. that's why we've urged the palestinians to expand and improve their security efforts and to take strong and meaningful action on incitement. it's why we have urged the arab states to take steps toward normalization of relations w
to become more democratic, and in that way, not one has chosen to adopt the united states system, and we should ask why. because it does not provide the same kind of representation. i do believe we should have proportional representation and if we don't get there yet, joyce surmising voting systems or combination thereof because for example how many saab the front page of "the new york times" where they talked about new york city had a runoff election and in a city of almost 8 million people almost nobody showed up to vote. 3 million registered democrats than you had some districts were actually nobody came to vote. we can do better than this, so maybe, and i would start i believe we should start looking at things like the electoral college which are anachronistic now and i know those might be fighting wars here but i would be happy to engage in think about how we want to improve our system. our system was great maybe for the 18th century but were now in the 21st century and there have been kinds of systems the pies that can be applied they can do things, make the electoral system more r
with the ballot. the united states needs to say to the world we have to solve the probm of our continng confrontation with the musm world it has undermined theuccess of president after president. and we cannot continue that way. we havto find a way to overcome that barri and therefore isel has to see itself in eontextf the whol western alliance. >> rose:riedman, rogan, cohen next. >> funding forcharlie rose has been provided by the following. >> each daa billion peopl won't find se drinking water. around the worlde're helping communites to access clean water. working to impve lives through conservation a education. one op at a time. >> additional fundg for charlirose was also proved by these funders . >> and b bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news d information services worldwide ptioning sponsored by rose communications from our studiosn new york ci, this is charlie rose. >> this was a big week in diplacy forresident oa. last nighte returned from a we long visit to asia it ok him to japan, singapore, china, south korea, during his first top in tokyo the present called himself americ
portfolios over the largest bank holding companies of the united states accounting for about 2/3 of all the assets of the banking system. we were able to look across banks and examiners and asset classes and combined our usual examination procedures with off sight surveillance done by economists using a wide range of statistical methods. i think we learned a largement in that exercise -- large amount in that exercise. the confidence in the banking sector rose significantly but we also learned great deal about how to examine banks in a comprehensive way across the entire system. . i think, henry, i think going forward what we really need to know will be how to examine the system as a whole. i think one of the failures of regulatory oversight during the crisis was our -- when i talk about regulators in general, how individual firms and how each individual firm is doing. one of the things we've learned and very challenging for us as we go forward will be that we need to look at the whole system. we need to see how the markets have interact with each other. have interact with each other. we
and the united states, and said we will manage the problem in this way, we are in a position where the rest of the world will follow. >> it is notorious for its choking pollution. it resents being criticized. it does make many of the things that we purchase. it is also emerging as a leader in green technology with a boom and solar panel production. it may be the first sign that china could join the international effort to tackle global warming. >> there was uproar in the indian parliament over reports that indicated senior leaders in the demolition of a mosque 17 years ago. the mosque was destroyed by a mob, triggering riots across the country between hindus and muslims. that led to the deaths of more an two dozen people. -- of more than 2,000 people. leaders in the form of prime minister -- leaders and the former prime minister were implicated. >> the may exchange palestinian detainees for the captive israeli soldier. a hamas delegation when to discuss a plan mediated by egypt in germany. the philippines president declared a state of emergency in the southern half of the country. there was
% by 2050. congress has not yet passed legislation which by make those cuts law in the united states. that is a battle still to be fought in washington. but the administration is clearly hoping that both domestic laws and an international treaty or attainable perhaps within the next year. >> just a note. visit our website for everything you need to know about climate change and the copenhagen summit. there are full details there on the science of global warming, also a summary of the main countries' positions. all that on our website. israel's prime minister has declared a 10-month restriction on new building in the jewish settlements on the best bank, but it doesn't include east jerusalem, and the palestinians have refused to attend taxi unless they stop building on all occupied territory. >> israel's plan is to restrict jewish settlement building on the west bank for a period of 10 months. it is aimed as bringing the palestinians back to the negotiating table. but many in the middle east see this as a cynical move. israel knows the palestinian position well. palestinian leaders hav
the job of the president of the united states? >> i believe that i am, but that's not to say that i'm putting myself out there to campaign or anything else. >> no not to say that, but you believe that you're smart enough, incisive enough, intellectual enough to handle the most powerful job in the world? do you believe that? >> i believe that i am because i have common sense and i have, i believe, the values that are reflective of so many other american values. >> joining the panel this week wall street journal editorial riley and kim strassel, to you first. do you think that sarah palin now looks presidential? >> well, i'm less concerned about her qualifications per se for being president and more interested in the question of whether she's the right to beat barack obama in 2012. if as we're told by the polesters, republicans need to win back these independent voters, that they lost to obama last year, is she the right person to do that? and we don't have a huge sample here to go by, but we do have the elections earlier this month. we had two republican gubernatorial candidates, one
, you can call us and here in the united states at one 877-742-5751, just say hey rick and then your spiel. >>> hey rick, in reference to the afghanistan war, the reason i'm against it is because of one word, terrain, terrain, our boys are not trained to in that terrain. i suggest we bring them out of there and use the big bombs, the big bombs that penetrate the earth and flatten the tunnels, flatten the mountains where the tunnels are on the border. (announcer) we understand. you want time to enjoy the holidays. >>> it's great that the commander in chief is sending over the troops, but he's also sending over beans, bullets and band-aids so i'm concerned about what the morale is there on the actual ground. i'm not too concerned about what the officers think, but what the actual troops, your lance corporals, your corporals, the sergeants and the people who are actually fighting the war and who are actually being shot at. >>> this information we have been sharing with you is getting a lot of heat and a lot of reaction all over the country. this is just during the break, a sampling of s
reasons. it's a second chae for the world commity to cometogether this time th the united state and with biing obligations in some form on china and other lae emerging economies an it's gnificant because the scientif community globally s ratched up their sense of alarm and you ar general they really don't he too many years to begin are redung the global warng pollution that is driving e earth ecological system toward catastrophe. >> rose: sy with that. they s ten years. the window ty say is ten years esseially? >> yeah, a they said that three years ago. >> rose: and cat trophy means what >> the's certain elements i the earth's ecologicasystem that could be pushedeyond a kind of tippi point the pase is controversial. but if the greenlandce pack, for example,as induced to mel so rapidly that it could note stopdhat would lead to catastrophic sea level re, silarly in west antarctica. eith would produce a six to seven met incree. the ze of the continental united states, it's been there r three million yes, a key elemenin the earth'sbility to cool itse, if i disappears it would not co
serious. look, they were in the same room, essentially, as the president of the united states, depending on the facts, depending on what this investigation concludes. there is the possibility of criminal charges, trespass or false statements. so, look, they will have to answer to the authorities about how it is that this was possible. and it's very, very serious, indeed. >> savannah guthrie, happy thanksgiving. great to see you all morning. thanks for joining us. >> reporter: sure. you, too, alex. >>> troops in iraq are being tre treated to a thanksgiving feast. here's some video courtesy of the department of defense. the troops in afghanistan are also sitting down to a turkey dinner. and they're even seeing a little nfl pro football there. that is where we find nbc's jim maceda for the goods, checking out the food, football and all the festivities there. how are the troops celebrating and how is it going this morning, jim? >> reporter: boy, i tell you, this has been going now for close to eight hours. it's gone from lunch into a dinner. and it's louder, and the place behind me -- you ca
problem will bring down other markets. stocks in the united states fell modestly. european markets gained friday, following the steep losses thursday when the u.s. markets were closed for the thanksgiving holiday. we will talk more about what is going on in to buy. let's go back to the phones. santa monica, california, danny on airline for democrats, go ahead. caller: i am a c-span junkie. host: are you going shopping this morning? caller: i saw an ad -- i saw a magazine called ad-busters and the advertised eight no-shopping day. i fast to be conscious of how we are overwhelmed with the amount of food we eat and plus the soldiers that cannot come home and eat. when i'm delirious the day after that, i will get the food but i bypass the shop and i will watch the coverage and see the faces of the people shopping. sometimes they are smiling but 90% of the time, they look very stressed out in photographs and the coverage in the news. i was calling to say that buy- nothing day is the best protest you can do and it is fantastic to be conscious of how we are manipulated by the credit card compani
, i'm going to work to get climate change legislation that can get 60 votes through the united states senate, and signed into law. i have worked very hard and you especially have worked hard, madam chairman, as you proceed forward and we will be able to work closely together to craft a bill that would create jobs in sacramento, california and helena, montana. we will craft a bill that will protect yosemite and yellow stone and that decreases our national security, by decreasing dependence on foreign oil and ultimately we will craft a bill that will secure america's economic end and environmental future for generations. i'm pledged to that. >> senator baucus, thank you so much. any colleagues wish to be heard? >> thank you very much, madam chair, and thank you again for your determination through this process. we know how important this big is. and i will be voting to report this bill out of committee, but as i said yesterday, i have a number of amendments that i'm frustrated i wasn't able to introduce because of the procedural barriers put up here by the fact our colleagues have not c
you. >> it is and gentlemen, welcome to the chamber of commerce of the united states of america. my name is ron summers of the u.s.-india business council. for 34 years we have strived to advance u.s.-india commercial ties. today, what a historic event we have before us. more than ever, the business communities of both our countries are needed to provide an impetus to this important relationship. ladies and gentleman, please stand with me and help me welcome the individuals who are making this possible -- tom donahue, into a newly, ambassador chancre, and the hon. prime minister of india, dr. manmohan singh. [applause] >> thank you very much. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. prime minister singh, ambassadors, distinguished guests, welcome to the united states chamber of commerce. mr. prime minister, we are delighted to be hosting you and your delegation today. we are certain you will have a productive visit to the united states. you are among friends. joining us today are some of the foremost business leaders in america and india. we extend a special welcome to the chair of the
about his new autobiography, and his 20 years in the united states senate. this is live on c-span every day, at 7:00 eastern. the center for american progress will have a forum on the u.s. education system tomorrow morning, including remarks by the education secretary, arnie duncan, and new york mayor michael blumberg. this is 8:00 eastern. >> the yeas are 60, the nays are 39. the motion is agreed upon. >> with that, the senate is moving the health care bill to the floor. starting on monday and through december, follow every minute of debate, and see how this would affect access to health care, abortion, and medicare, on the only network that gives you the senate, -- 2-gavel, c-span2. >> -- gavel to gavel, c-span2. >> the president and his wife hosted the indian prime minister. we have our coverage behind the scenes. >> this is the first state dinner of the obama administration, and the third for thindia in one decade. these are being held behind me and we are joined by nia-maleka henderson. who are some of the notable people tonight? >> oprah winfrey was not here tonight, but her best
from the cris so far worldwide which mostly concentrate on the united states $1.7 trillion. we're talkingbout credit sses in dubai o perhaps 0 billion. that an order of magnitude, tw orders of magnitude smaller in dubai than what we have senn the united states. the additional problems in the united states are another 100, 200,00 billion b they are coming on top of all these existing probls. they are comi into a banki system that is weak already in the uited states. >>warner: so briefly do we ve reason to be nervousby hat happened today in dubai. >> yes,t should make us nervou came at an ago waurd time. abu dhabi is closed for usiness until mondaso we don't know whateal they work ouuntil at least sunday. and if monday we have new rk opening without full relution of the issue, ithout total clarity it is going to be a difficult wee >> warner: si upon johnson of m.t. and the person institute, thank you so much. >> ank you. >> odruff: in other news today iran was censured r its nuclear pgram by the u.n.'s nuclear watch dog agency. 25 nations including cha and russia apoved the resol
. those are things that are are unpopular. and he's a president of the united states being told by the military, mr. president, we can't defend those outposts and we need more people to do a countersurge insurgency. and i guess it these are correct and they puts 43,000 troops in, imagine the progressiveness, with the troops, if you don't advance health care. i think he'll find 10,000 and train the army because he's politically unsustainable with his base, if he puts in 43,000 troops and prosecutes afghanistan during a water with afghanistan as president, i think he'll have a democrat primary and that we'll have a substantial split mountain democrat party, if that's what he does. and i would argue this -- for our party, and the tensions between our kind of economic votes and our religious conservatives, the fact that the energy in republican party is about spending and deficit, if we're so inept we can't take these people and make them part of a new coalition, they we oughting to nothinged. the -- this are 24% of the people in this country who say they would likely vote for a thi
to copenhagen. it signals to the world that he is serious and the united states is serious about taking a step toward a final binding agreement. >> reporter: in copenhagen the president will propose the united states cut its greenhouse gas emissions in a range of 17% by 2020. >> from the environmental perspective it's not quite enough to get to where we need to be, but it's a really, really important start. >> reporter: still, not enough for some. friends of the earth call the 17% target weak. mr. obama's proposal is far less than the cuts promised by japan and the european union. even the united nations climate chief offered only lukewarm praise. >> the world is very much looking to the united states to come forward with an emission reduction target and to contribute international financial support to help developing countries. >> reporter: in other words, come up with the money so poor nations, the most vulnerable to climate change, can buy the technologies to adapt. on climate change the president has two audiences -- the world, which wants united states leadership, and the u.s. senate, whi
to seven mer incase. thsize of the continental united states, it's been the for three million ars, a key elemt in the earth ability to cool itlf, ift disappears it would not come bk on a time scale thatould be comfortable for human species. also thatould lead to the awing of the perm fro around the arctic tha ctains so much ozen carbon that the amount in the atmosphere could double and that would mak the task of restoring a favorable climate balance forumanity much more difficult. there are other such tping points but the earth system is ve complex. yes ago a distinguished scientist inhis city,ally brucker, said "it's an angry beast and we're poking i with a stic" and without getting to detas we're now at a point where the most serious a distinguhed scientists who studiedhis are waing that we are real playing with fire e where the future of human civilizion is concerned. >> rose: hp educa us as to the terminology r how w will measure emsion standards. >> well, ere's a baseline for ever country that describesow ch global warming pollution they're puttin up each year. >> rose: and the u. a
-winner. welcome to our viewers in the united states and around the world. wolf blitzer is off today. i'm suzanne malveaux, and you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama is about to reveal a new strategy for the war in afghanistan. he'll travel to the u.s. military academy at west point on tuesday where he's going to brief the nation on his plans to send more troops to the war zone. this week, he signaled that determination. >> after eight years, some of those years in which we did not have, i think, either the resources or the strategy to get the job done, it is my intention to finish the job. >> tens of thousands of troops are assumed likely to get marching orders, but will more troops make a difference? i put that question to cnn's veteran war correspondent, michael ware. >> it depends on what the michael hopes to achieve. if the president wants to put pressure on the taliban war machine, then yes, he needs to send more troops because right now with all of the u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan, the taliban machinery is virtually untouched. indeed, american operations are feeding in
. there are goals on the table. there's a mission ranges the united states wants to talk b. i think there could be more calibrated areas of success than the cold yes or no that comes in the olympics. and he's going to be one of many heads of states there association the whole dynamic is different. it would be hard for him not to show up, this is a long meeting. he will be there a day to make an address. >> in terms of the rest of the heads of state, there was some issue, the president's going to hit that on december 9, towards the beginning when the majority of the heads of states are coming later in this conference. >> reporter: well, i don't know if that is good or bad but probably it means that he won't be ameshed in some of the inter and intra, multilateral dealings that will go on. but there are going to be many cabinet members coming and going and other high officials from the united states so it's not like there won't be a seat at the table by the united states with a high level official. >> to what extent, john, does this give a conference which had pretty low expectations originally, a
security interests of the united states. there are a lot of people who failed to mention this as an important topic for many years, who have apparently found this country on the map recently. >> asked what bit of information was holding him back, mr. obama said nothing is missing, per se, except a strategy for success in turning around the 8-year-old war. >> i don't think this is a matter of some data or information that i'm waiting on. it is a matter of making certain that when i send young men and women into war, and i devote billions of dollars of u.s. taxpayer money, that it's making us safer. >> the president promised to make his decision, quote, soon, but not before at least one more strategy session. >> i doubt that this is going to be finished again without an additional -- at least an additional meeting. >> analysts say strategic debates deprive u.s. forces of clarity. >> some think these decisions should be made in conference rooms in washington and reevaluating strategy, instead of giving commanders on the ground the ability to make decisions based on situation
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